"Wall mounted panel with optical projections that manipulate light in different ways to create transient patterns of colour light and shade that change with the angle and intensity of light."

"Wall mounted panel with optical projections that manipulate light in different ways to create transient patterns of colour light and shade that change with the angle and intensity of light."

"Glitched is a set started in 2013. It is currently composed of seven pieces composed as follows: in a smoked glass cube, which allows only very little light, is a diorama, a revival of a scene in volume, scaled. in Glitched#1, you can see a road, streetlights, trees, bushes, various urban elements and a house. The house is a 3D print (stereolithography) of a 3D file having been corrupted. Indeed, the original file of a classic suburban house has been forced to go through several stages of interpretation of the data, passing through various voluntarily inappropriate softwares, causing data corruption, the generation of an (or several) error(s), uncontrolled modification of the initial volume: a “glitch” (*). This is this glitch that is shown in the black cube. Filters, blocking 95% of light, set the scene in an artificial night. The shape of the object allows 5 different views of the scene, which is discernible only at a very short distance from the glass walls, stimulating the viewer’s curiosity. In each of the scenes from the set “Glitched”, there is no evidence of movement or displacement, and no representation of any alive beings, which plunges it into a confused temporal setting, wedged between photography and cinematography . This set is based on researches by Heinz Von Foerster, applied to the fields of Art. Heinz Von Foerster was an Austrian scientist and philosopher, founder of cybernetics. His studies propose to enter into a post-digital era because we’d reached the end of digital systems, which leaves no place for errors, Heinz Von Foerster concluded thus the need to create physical systems creating errors in order to discover new shapes. Here is a (small) thumbed his nose at this, because it is digital systems themselves, cleverly diverted, causing these errors, and opening up new fields of investigation."

"Glitched is a set started in 2013. It is currently composed of seven pieces composed as follows: in a smoked glass cube, which allows only very little light, is a diorama, a revival of a scene in volume, scaled. in Glitched#1, you can see a road, streetlights, trees, bushes, various urban elements and a house. The house is a 3D print (stereolithography) of a 3D file having been corrupted. Indeed, the original file of a classic suburban house has been forced to go through several stages of interpretation of the data, passing through various voluntarily inappropriate softwares, causing data corruption, the generation of an (or several) error(s), uncontrolled modification of the initial volume: a “glitch” (*). This is this glitch that is shown in the black cube. Filters, blocking 95% of light, set the scene in an artificial night. The shape of the object allows 5 different views of the scene, which is discernible only at a very short distance from the glass walls, stimulating the viewer’s curiosity. In each of the scenes from the set “Glitched”, there is no evidence of movement or displacement, and no representation of any alive beings, which plunges it into a confused temporal setting, wedged between photography and cinematography . This set is based on researches by Heinz Von Foerster, applied to the fields of Art. Heinz Von Foerster was an Austrian scientist and philosopher, founder of cybernetics. His studies propose to enter into a post-digital era because we’d reached the end of digital systems, which leaves no place for errors, Heinz Von Foerster concluded thus the need to create physical systems creating errors in order to discover new shapes. Here is a (small) thumbed his nose at this, because it is digital systems themselves, cleverly diverted, causing these errors, and opening up new fields of investigation."

"These images are the result of physically weaving together two photographic prints of the same subject. They are an attempt to bridge dignified, direct portraits with a sort of abstraction that allows their subjects to hide within themselves, and the photographs to be distinctly physical objects. In hiding some things, we reveal others."

"These images are the result of physically weaving together two photographic prints of the same subject. They are an attempt to bridge dignified, direct portraits with a sort of abstraction that allows their subjects to hide within themselves, and the photographs to be distinctly physical objects. In hiding some things, we reveal others."